Green deal for the building regulations screapped, for now.
 
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News 05/10/2010

Changes to the Building Regulations set to be scrapped using the Green Deal.

green deal scrapped

We understand that the decision has not yet been taken by Government Ministers on the proposed changes to the Building Regulations, widely known as 'consequential improvements’ and dubbed a "conservatory tax" by sections of the media But a Government source has told us that it is "unlikely" the changes to the Building Regulations will go ahead at this moment in time due to the tough economic conditions and the extra costs to home-owners.

The Government turnabout is highly embarrassing it will mean that more than two million homes will fail to take up the Green Deal, the Government’s flagship green policy that has been in the planning for several years.

Consequential improvements

The 'consequential improvements’ proposals were first announced at the start of 2012, after many years of background planning, officials indicated they would drive up demand for the Green Deal by regulating that existing homes that took on new projects such as kitchen extensions, loft and garage conversions that the buildings owner spend up to 10 per cent of the value of the extension on energy efficiency improvements.

Figures released by the Government at the time estimated there were 200,000 new domestic extensions and conversions every year in the U.K. 1.4 million boiler replacements and more than one million windows replaced.

The Government has been having consultations with groups such as the L.A.B.C. (Local Authority Building Control) And R.I.B.A. (Royal Institute of British Architects to find strong opposition to the plans that they felt were unworkable and unenforceable.

The average home-owner faced with a 10 percent bill for Consequential improvements would simply try to get the cost of the home improvements down thus making the building less environmentally friendly, or not bother with the work at all.

Green Deal implications

The documents suggest the proposed changes to the Building Regulations could have led to 2.2 million households taking up the Green Deal. It also said 82 per cent of respondents to the consultation were in favour of the changes, while the majority of home-owners found the proposals either "agreeable or very agreeable".

Our Comment

We believe that Consequential improvements are one of the worst thought through ideas that this Government has come up with since being in office, nearly as bad as relaxing the Planning laws to enable larger extensions in peoples back gardens.

 

 

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